Calendar

Feb
20
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Debra Mathews “Implementing ethics in autonomous systems” @ Hackerman B-17
Feb 20 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Abstract:

Debra JH Mathews, PhD, MA, is the Assistant Director for Science Programs for the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and affiliate faculty in the Institute of Genetic Medicine. Dr. Mathews earned her PhD in genetics from Case Western Reserve University. Concurrent with her PhD, she earned a Master’s degree in bioethics, also from Case. She completed a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in genetics at Johns Hopkins, and the Greenwall Fellowship in Bioethics and Health Policy at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities. Dr. Mathews has also spent time at the Genetics and Public Policy Center, the US Department of Health and Human Services, and the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, working in various capacities on science policy. Dr. Mathews’s academic work focuses on ethics and policy issues raised by emerging biotechnologies, with particular focus on genetics, stem cell science, neuroscience and synthetic biology.

 

Bio:

Debra JH Mathews, PhD, MA, is the Assistant Director for Science Programs for the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and affiliate faculty in the Institute of Genetic Medicine. Dr. Mathews earned her PhD in genetics from Case Western Reserve University. Concurrent with her PhD, she earned a Master’s degree in bioethics, also from Case. She completed a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in genetics at Johns Hopkins, and the Greenwall Fellowship in Bioethics and Health Policy at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities. Dr. Mathews has also spent time at the Genetics and Public Policy Center, the US Department of Health and Human Services, and the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, working in various capacities on science policy. Dr. Mathews’s academic work focuses on ethics and policy issues raised by emerging biotechnologies, with particular focus on genetics, stem cell science, neuroscience and synthetic biology.

 

Feb
27
Wed
LCSR Seminar: LCSR Faculty “Interviewing for Jobs in Academia and Industry” @ Hackerman B-17
Feb 27 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Interviewing for Jobs in Academia and Industry: A LCSR Professional Development Seminar

Speakers: Louis Whitcomb, Marin Kobilarov, and the LCSR Faculty

 

There will be pizza!

 

 

Mar
5
Tue
LCSR Seminar: Emma Tegling “Performance limitations of large-scale networks with distributed dynamic feedback” @ Hackerman 320
Mar 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Abstract: Networked control systems arise in a wide range of applications. These systems typically have a global control objective, while the control is distributed and relies only on local feedback from a neighborhood around each site. In this talk, I will address the question of what this implies in terms of limitations to the overall performance of such systems, in particular as the networks grow large. We consider networked dynamical systems with double integrator dynamics, controlled with linear consensus-like algorithms. Such systems can be used to model, for example, vehicular formation dynamics and synchronization in electric power networks. We assume that the systems are subject to distributed disturbances and study performance in terms of H2 norm metrics that capture the notion of network coherence. In the context of power networks,  we also show how such metrics can be used to quantify losses due to non-equilibrium power flows. With localized, static feedback control, there are known performance limitations that cause these metrics to scale unfavorably with the network size. We discuss the underlying reasons for these unfavorable scalings and propose distributed dynamic feedback controllers, which under certain conditions alleviate the limitations of static feedback.

 

Bio: Emma Tegling (née Sjödin) received her Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering in January 2019, and her B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees, both in Engineering Physics, in 2011 and 2013. All degrees are from KTH Royal Institute of Technology. At present, she is a postdoctoral researcher with the Division of Decision and Control Systems at KTH. Emma has also spent time as a visiting researcher at California Institute of Technology in 2011, the Johns Hopkins University in 2013 and the University of California at Santa Barbara in 2015. Prior to her doctoral work, she was a strategy consultant with Ericsson. Emma’s research interests are within analysis and control of large-scale networked systems, with a particular focus on highly distributed power grids.

Mar
6
Wed
LCSR Seminar Career Services “Elevator Pitch and Networking” @ Hackerman B-17
Mar 6 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Mar
13
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Michael Oelze “Novel Techniques and Approaches in Diagnostic Ultrasound: What You Haven’t Heard!” @ Hackerman B-17
Mar 13 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Abstract:

Ultrasound is ubiquitous in clinical practice because it is safe, portable, inexpensive and real time. However, the image quality of ultrasound is much less than MRI or X-ray CT because the contrast of ultrasound is typically low and ultrasonic images are rife with speckle. We have been developing different techniques to improve ultrasonic imaging by providing new sources of image contrast and improving spatial resolution. These new techniques include: development of quantitative ultrasound, ultrasound tomography with limited angle backscatter, novel super resolution beamforming techniques and coding techniques for effectively improving transducer bandwidth. In addition to imaging, we have developed communication protocols using ultrasound as the communication channel and have demonstrated data rates capable of streaming high definition video.  In this talk we will discuss different applications of these ultrasonic imaging and communications techniques. Specifically, we will show how quantitative ultrasound approaches have been successful at classifying tissue state, monitoring focused ultrasound therapy, detecting early response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and the automatic detection of nerves in the imaging field. We will demonstrate how our super resolution technique can improve image quality for specific imaging tasks such as detecting bright specular scatterers. Finally, we will discuss the ability of ultrasound to act as the communication channel for implanted medical devices.

 

Bio:

Professor Oelze was born in Hamilton, New Zealand in 1971. He earned a B.S. in Physics and Mathematics (1994, Harding University) and Ph.D. in Physics (2000, OleMiss). From 2000 to 2002 Dr. Oelze served as a post-doc in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) inside the Bioacoustics Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). From 2002 to 2004, Dr. Oelze was a NIH fellow conducting research in quantitative ultrasound techniques for biomedical ultrasound applications in cancer detection. Dr. Oelze joined the faculty of ECE at the UIUC in 2005 and continues to serve as a Professor and Associate Head for Graduate Affairs. He is a Professor in the Carle Illinois College of Medicine. His research interests include biomedical ultrasound, quantitative ultrasound imaging for improving cancer diagnostics and monitoring therapy response, ultrasound bioeffects, ultrasound tomography techniques, ultrasound-based therapy, beamforming and applications of coded excitation to ultrasonic imaging. Currently, Dr. Oelze is a fellow of the AIUM, a senior member of the IEEE, and a member of ASA. He is a member of the Technical Program Committee of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. He currently serves as an associate editor-in-chief of IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonic, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control, associate editor of Ultrasonic Imaging and associate editor for IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering.

 

Mar
22
Fri
JHU Robotics Industry Day 2019 @ Glass Pavilion, Levering Hall
Mar 22 @ 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

 

The Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics will highlight its elite robotics students and showcase cutting-edge research projects in areas that include Medical Robotics, Extreme Environments Robotics, Human-Machine Systems for Manufacturing, BioRobotics and more. JHU Robotics Industry Day will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Levering Hall on the Homewood Campus at Johns Hopkins University.

Robotics Industry Day will provide top companies and organizations in the private and public sectors with access to the LCSR’s forward-thinking, solution-driven students. The event will also serve as an informal opportunity to explore university-industry partnerships.

You will experience dynamic presentations and discussions, observe live demonstrations, and participate in speed networking sessions that afford you the opportunity to meet Johns Hopkins most talented robotics students before they graduate.

Please contact Ashley Moriarty if you have any questions. You can register HERE.


Download our 2018 Industry Day booklet

Schedule of Events

(TBA)

 


Please contact Ashley Moriarty if you have any questions.

Mar
27
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Chen Li @ Hackerman B-17
Mar 27 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Abstract:

TBD

 

Bio:

TBD

 

Apr
3
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Panagiotis Artemiadis @ Hackerman B-17
Apr 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Abstract:

TBD

 

Bio:

TBD

 

Apr
10
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Jana Kosecka @ Hackerman B-17
Apr 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Abstract:

TBD

 

Bio:

TBD

 

Apr
17
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Nick Theodore @ Hackerman B-17
Apr 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Abstract:

TBD

 

Bio:

TBD

 

Laboratory for Computational Sensing + Robotics