Calendar

Apr
20
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Tim Salcudean “Ultrasound-based guidance for robot assisted prostate surgery” @ https://wse.zoom.us/s/94623801186
Apr 20 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Link for Live Seminar

Link for Recorded seminars – 2021/2022 school year

 

Abstract:

The talk will present a survey of my research activities, with more detailed presentation of our guidance system for robot-assisted prostate cancer surgery. The majority of prostate cancer surgery is carried out with the da Vinci surgical system. Tracking of instruments and hand-eye calibration of this robotic system enables the overlay of pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging by registration to real-time ultrasound. This enables visualization of sub-surface anatomy and cancer. We will discuss our system design, visualization and registration approaches.

We will also discuss instrumentation for force sensing using the da Vinci Research Kit, and a new approach to teleguidance for ultrasound examinations.

 

Biography:

Tim Salcudean is a Professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, where he holds the C.A. Laszlo Chair in Biomedical Engineering. He is cross-appointed with the UBC School of Biomedical Engineering and the Vancouver Prostate Centre. He is on the steering committee of the IPCAI conference and on the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Robotics Research. He is a Fellow of IEEE, MICCAI and of the Canadian Academy of Engineering. His research interests are in medical robotics, medical image analysis and elastography imaging.

Apr
27
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Panel on Careers in Robotics A Panel Discussion With Experts From Industry and Academia @ https://wse.zoom.us/s/94623801186
Apr 27 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Link for Live Seminar

Link for Recorded seminars – 2021/2022 school year

 

Panelists:

  • Courtney Schmitt, BE-3U Lead Controls Engineer, Blue Origin (JHU Class of 2018, B.S. Mechanical Engineering, JHU Class of 2019, M.S.E. Robotics)
    • Courtney is the lead controls engineer at Blue Origin for the BE-3U Engine. Courtney joined Blue Origin in 2019 after completing her Masters in Robotics and her Bachelors in Mechanical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Before joining Blue Origin, Courtney completed an internship at Virgin Galactic and worked at an autonomous underwater vehicle startup. While at Johns Hopkins she participated in a variety of research including a project to map the locations of black holes in the universe, researching autonomous vehicles, and working with the Space Telescope Science Institute for her senior design capstone project. In 2018, she was selected to receive the Brooke Owens Fellowship, a competitive fellowship awarded to women pursuing careers in the space industry. Courtney was also recently named to the 20 under 35 SSPI list in 2021.
      Outside of work hours, Courtney volunteered for the Community School of Baltimore during her undergraduate studies as a STEM educator. She was a co-founder and President of the JHU chapter of the Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS) with the goal of bringing together the space community at JHU across a variety of majors and disciplines. She has frequently mentored students as well as an all-girls First Robotics team from the Museum of Flight in Washington.
  • Rachel Hegeman, Software Engineer, Waymo (JHU Class of 2016, B.S. Mechanical Engineering & B.S. Applied Math, JHU Class of 2019, M.S.E. Computer Science)
    • Hi, my name is Rachel and I like robots. I started working with underwater robots at JHU in the Dynamical Systems and Control Lab (DSCL) in 2015, and after graduating undergrad I spent a few years with the JHU Applied Physics Lab (JHUAPL) working on experimental reconnaissance systems. At this time, I also worked with the Biomechanical and Image Guided Surgical Systems Lab (BIGSS) to ascertain the efficacy of various autonomous surgical systems and imaging techniques. I got my Masters in Computer Science in 2019, and then headed west for a job with Waymo working on reasoning within the vehicle’s planner. At Waymo, I just recently transferred teams to focus more on trajectory optimization.
  • Ann Majewicz Fey
  • Amanda Zimmet

 

Aug
31
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Welcome Townhall “Review of LCSR” @ Hackerman B17
Aug 31 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Sep
7
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Tania Morimoto “Flexible Surgical Robots: Design, Sensing, and Control” @ Hackerman B17
Sep 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Link for Live Seminar

Link for Recorded seminars – 2022/2023 school year

 

Abstract:

Flexible and soft medical robots offer capabilities beyond those of conventional rigid-link robots due to their ability to traverse confined spaces and conform to highly curved paths. They also offer potential for improved safety due to their inherent compliance. In this talk, I will present several new robot designs for various surgical applications. In particular, I will discuss our work on soft, growing robots that achieve locomotion by material extending from their tip. I will discuss limitations in miniaturizing such robots, along with methods for actively steering, sensing, and controlling them. Finally, I will discuss new sensing and human-in-the-loop control paradigms that are aimed at improving the performance of flexible surgical robots.

Bio:

Tania Morimoto is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and in the Department of Surgery at the University of California, San Diego. She received the B.S. degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, all in mechanical engineering. Her research lab focuses on the design and control of flexible continuum robots for increased dexterity and accessibility in uncertain environments, particularly for minimally invasive surgical interventions. They are also working to address the challenges of designing human-in-the-loop interfaces for controlling these flexible and soft robots, including the integration of haptic feedback to improve surgical outcomes. She is a recipient of the Hellman Fellowship (2021), the Beckman Young Investigator Award (2022), and the NSF CAREER Award (2022).

Sep
14
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Tamas Haidegger “Medtech research and beyond at Óbuda University” @ Hackerman B17
Sep 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Link for Live Seminar

Link for Recorded seminars – 2022/2023 school year

 

Abstract:

Extreme globalization, war in the Western World, COVID-19 are presenting together an unprecedented challenge for humanity. Engineering intelligent systems and robotics can help to counter-balance the negative effects in a number of ways. Potential technology-driven solutions include the emergence of medical robots, Surgical Data Science, AI-based support for early anomaly detection and health diagnosis, rescue robotics, smart agrifood robotic solutions and beyond. Much of these areas are addressed by the various applied research projects of the University Research and Innovation center (EKIK) at Óbuda University. This presentation highlights through examples the role that robotics and automation can play in living up to global challenges. The talk will also cover the ethical implications of robotics research, in both the emergency and post-pandemic world, with a specific focus on the 2015 UN Sustainable Development Goals.

 

Sep
21
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Mark Savage “Elevator Pitch Workshop” @ Hackerman B17
Sep 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Sep
28
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Amy Bastian “Learning and relearning human movement” @ Hackerman B17
Sep 28 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Link for Live Seminar

Link for Recorded seminars – 2022/2023 school year

 

Abstract:

Human motor learning depends on a suite of brain mechanisms that are driven by different signals and operate on timescales ranging from minutes to years.  Understanding these processes requires identifying how new movement patterns are normally acquired, retained, and generalized, as well as the effects of distinct brain lesions.  The lecture will focus on normal and abnormal motor learning, and how we can use this information to improve rehabilitation for individuals with neurological damage.

 

Bio:

Dr. Amy Bastian is a neuroscientist who has made important contributions to the neuroscience of sensorimotor control.  She is the Chief Science Officer at the Kennedy Krieger Institute, and Director of the motion analysis laboratory that studies the neural control of human movement.  Dr. Bastian is also a Professor of Neuroscience, Neurology and PM&R at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  Dr. Bastian is a recognized and highly accomplished neuroscientists whose interests include understanding cerebellar function/dysfunction, locomotor learning mechanisms, motor learning in development, and how to rehabilitate people with many types of neurological diseases.

Oct
5
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Malcolm MacIver “Biological planning deciphered via AI algorithms and robot-animal competition in partially observable environments” @ Hackerman B17
Oct 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Link for Live Seminar

Link for Recorded seminars – 2022/2023 school year

 

Abstract: Planning, the ability to imagine different futures and select one assessed to have high value, is one of the most vaunted of animal capacities. As such it has been a central target of artificial intelligence work from the origins of that field, in addition to being a focus of neuroscience and cognitive science. These separate and sometimes synergistic traditions are combined in our new work exploring the origin and mechanics of planning in animals. We will show how mammals evade autonomous robot “predators” in complex large arenas. We have discovered that depending on the arrangement and density of barriers to vision, animals appear to carefully manage their uncertainty about the predator’s location in order to reach their goal. Their behavior appears unlikely to be driven by cached responses that were successful in the past, but rather based on planning during brief pauses over which they peek at the hidden robot adversary that is looking for them. After peeking, they re-route to avoid the predator.

 

Bio: Malcolm A. MacIver is a group leader of the Center for Robotics and Biosystems at Northwestern University, with a joint appointment between Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, and courtesy appointments in the Department of Neurobiology and the Department of Computer Science. His work focuses on extracting principles underlying animal behavior, focusing on interactions between biomechanics, sensory systems, and planning circuits. He then incorporates these principles into biorobotic systems or simulations of the animal in its environment for synergy between technological and scientific advances. For this work he received the 2009 Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering from President Obama at the White House. MacIver has also developed interactive science-inspired art installations that have exhibited internationally, and consults for science fiction film and TV series makers.

Oct
7
Fri
JHU Robotics Career Fair
Oct 7 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

LCSR Career Fair – October 7, 2022 1-4pm EDT

We would like to invite you to participate in the first annual Johns Hopkins Robotics Career Fair. The event will be completely online (virtual) on Gather.town.  The goal is to help connect students and industry with internships and jobs. The tentative schedule include a keynote speaker from 1-2pm, elevator pitch practice with Industry professionals working one-on-one with students from 2-3pm, and then virtual company job-fair from 3-4pm in which each company/organization will have a dedicated virtual “table” to meet with our students.

Friday 10/7
Gather.Town
1:00 pm Keynote Speaker: Keynote by Stephen Aylward, Senior Director of Strategic Initiatives at Kitware
2:00 pm Elevator Pitch Practice: For students with Industry Professionals
3:00 pm Virtual Company Job Fair

If you would like to participate, please email Ashley Moriarty by Thursday September 15, 2022. More info on our Industry Page

 

Keynote Speaker: Stephen Aylward “Do something slightly different”

 

Abstract: This talk explores the increasing overlap that exists in academic and industry environments, the role of research and product development in those environments, and how you can shape your career to succeed in either.  It also explores how adopting the concepts and tools of open science can lead to success in both.

Bio: Stephen Aylward’s industry career began as an MS graduate surrounded by PhDs in the AI research labs at McDonnell Douglas.  He then received a PhD in computer science and became a tenured associate professor in the department of radiology at UNC.  That was followed by him pivoting back to industry and founding Kitware’s office in North Carolina, where he has had many roles as the company grew.  He successfully patented and licensed software while in academia and played lead roles in the development of numerous open-source projects including ITK and 3D Slicer while in industry.  He now serves as Senior Director of Strategic Initiatives at Kitware, as an adjunct professor in computer science at UNC, and as chair of the advisory board for the development of MONAI, a leading open-source PyTorch library for medical AI.  His NIH, DARPA, and DoD funded research currently focuses on point-of-care AI and developing quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy measures to aid in the care of trauma victims in ambulances, emergency departments, and intensive care units.

 

Oct
12
Wed
LCSR Seminar: Student Seminar @ Hackerman B17
Oct 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University, Whiting School of Engineering

3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2608

Laboratory for Computational Sensing + Robotics