Uluc Saranli: Model-Based Methods for Robotic Legged Locomotion

When:
February 4, 2015 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
2015-02-04T12:00:00-05:00
2015-02-04T13:00:00-05:00
Where:
B17 Hackerman Hall
Contact:
Noah Cowan

Abstract

Legged mobility has long been among key research areas in mobile robotics. In this context, accurate dynamic models of locomotory behaviors provide tools that are useful both in understanding biological systems as well as constructing robots and controllers to realize these behaviors. In this talk, I will focus on the latter, using spring-mass models that have been instrumental in the understanding and artificial realization of running behaviors. I will first describe our work in finding approximate analytic solutions for spring-mass models of running, which possess otherwise non-integrable stance dynamics. I will then show different applications of these solutions, including adaptive control, state estimation and footstep planning for planar running. Subsequently, I will describe a new method for energy regulation through virtual tuning of damping properties for such systems, towards a level of energy and power efficiency that has not been possible with previous methods.

 

Speaker Bio

Dr. Uluç Saranlı is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Engineering in Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey. He received his B.S. degree in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from The Middle East Technical University, Turkey in 1996. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from The University of Michigan in 1998 and 2002, respectively. He then joined the Robotics Institute in Carnegie Mellon University as a postdoctoral associate until 2005. Before joining Middle East Technical University in 2012, he was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Engineering in Bilkent University. His research interests focus on autonomous robotic mobility, with specific contributions in modeling, analysis, control of legged locomotion and behavioral planning for dynamically dexterous robot morphologies.

Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University, Whiting School of Engineering

3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2608

Laboratory for Computational Sensing + Robotics